Top 5 Mistakes People Make When Adopting a Cat from the Shelter

Not understanding why cats are at the shelter.

You might not have known, but shelters often have cats brought in by their owners. There are many reasons why someone might relinquish ownership of their cat to a shelter. These reasons include:

  • behavioral issues like inappropriate elimination or aggression
  • interference with other pets in the home
  • excessive vocalization or scratching
  • medical issues like hyperthyroidism, diabetes, and kidney failure

Unfortunately, overcrowding at shelters is an ongoing issue. Shelters are often understaffed and cannot care for as many animals as they take in. When overcrowding occurs at a shelter, the only way to manage it is to euthanize animals so that others can stay in the shelter. This practice is sometimes referred to as “putting down” an animal because euthanasia involves administering a lethal injection that causes an animal to fall asleep and stop breathing.

Not finding the right match for your home.

Failing to find the right match for your home could turn out badly, as you want a cat that matches well with your personality and lifestyle. If you’re an active person who likes to go on runs before work or enjoy hiking on weekends, you probably don’t want a cat who spends most of the day sleeping on your couch. Just like people, each cat has its own unique personality. Make sure it’s a good fit!

When I adopted my first cat, I didn’t know much about cats and wanted someone who would be incredibly affectionate with me—which wasn’t the best fit for my shy little rescue kitty! If you have kids, consider adopting an older cat instead of a kitten. Kittens are still learning how to play gently and can unintentionally hurt young children by scratching them or knocking them over during play.

Making assumptions about the cat’s behavior.

People often make assumptions about the cat’s behavior based on their own expectations and experiences. The shelter is not a perfect predictor of how the cat will behave in your home; while they can give you an idea, it’s up to you to decide whether or not the cat is right for your lifestyle. Don’t assume that a cat doesn’t like you if they don’t immediately run up to greet you; a more aloof personality could mean that he/she needs time to adjust before becoming friendly, or even that he/she prefers some alone time. Don’t assume that a cat who seems shy at first will remain shy forever; he/she could simply be hiding from all of the activity going on around him/her and may become more outgoing once out of the shelter. Don’t assume that a very friendly, affectionate cat will remain friendly and affectionate towards children if there aren’t any in your house, as this could have been due to spending time with children who visited him/her at the shelter regularly. Don’t assume anything about any aspect of the cat’s behavior—the only way to really know how they’ll behave is by adopting them and spending enough time with them to form an opinion (which is why many shelters allow foster care).

Being in a hurry to adopt a cat and not researching or asking questions.

  • Do your research!
  • You’re doing this already by reading this blog post. Good for you, and thank you for that.
  • Some other things you should do: Look at the cat’s behavior (if possible) before adopting them. If not, ask about their temperament and history. Are they friendly? Shy? How old are they? What is their background story? Have they been abused in the past?
  • Check out its health! Does it need a special diet or have other medical needs that you may be expected to take care of as an owner? Is it okay as a kitty around dogs or young kids?
  • Ask questions if there’s anything else on your mind. Who could possibly know more about a specific shelter cat than a shelter employee who has been taking care of them every day for weeks?

Not understanding the cat’s schedule and needs when you first bring them home.

Once you bring your new cat home, it’s important to understand that they may be scared and shy at first. Even if they seem friendly at the shelter, it’s likely because they are familiar with their surroundings. If you want to earn their trust right away, the best thing you can do is leave them alone and let them adjust to their new environment at their own pace. It’s a good idea to have an area where the cat can hide for a few days if necessary, like behind a couch or under a bed. Cats like these spaces because they are dark and enclosed. It also provides them with a sense of security until they become more comfortable in their new home.

You should also consider giving your cat treats during these first few days as a way to get them used to you early on. Don’t force your new cat into an interaction with you if he or she does not seem comfortable with it—you don’t want your cat feeling like he must trust you when he actually doesn’t feel safe yet! Just let him know that treats are available when he is ready for them, which will provide him with much-needed comfort while he adjusts without making him feel trapped or cornered.

Just because a cat is at a shelter doesn’t mean that they have done anything wrong – it may just be that their owner was unable to care for them anymore, or they were born there. Shelter cats make wonderful companions!

I find it can be a misconception among people who are adopting for the first time that cats at shelters have done something wrong and that’s why they ended up there. While this may be true sometimes, most of the time cats end up in shelters due to no fault of their own. They may have been abandoned by their owners, or they were born there. Just because a cat is in a shelter does not mean that he is bad – I would argue that many shelter cats make wonderful companions as they are likely seeking attention more than others!Not understanding why cats are at the shelter.

You might not have known, but shelters often have cats brought in by their owners. There are many reasons why someone might relinquish ownership of their cat to a shelter. These reasons include:

behavioral issues like inappropriate elimination or aggression

interference with other pets in the home

excessive vocalization or scratching

medical issues like hyperthyroidism, diabetes, and kidney failure

Unfortunately, overcrowding at shelters is an ongoing issue. Shelters are often understaffed and cannot care for as many animals as they take in. When overcrowding occurs at a shelter, the only way to manage it is to euthanize animals so that others can stay in the shelter. This practice is sometimes referred to as “putting down” an animal because euthanasia involves administering a lethal injection that causes an animal to fall asleep and stop breathing.

Not finding the right match for your home.

Failing to find the right match for your home could turn out badly, as you want a cat that matches well with your personality and lifestyle. If you’re an active person who likes to go on runs before work or enjoy hiking on weekends, you probably don’t want a cat who spends most of the day sleeping on your couch. Just like people, each cat has its own unique personality. Make sure it’s a good fit!

When I adopted my first cat, I didn’t know much about cats and wanted someone who would be incredibly affectionate with me—which wasn’t the best fit for my shy little rescue kitty! If you have kids, consider adopting an older cat instead of a kitten. Kittens are still learning how to play gently and can unintentionally hurt young children by scratching them or knocking them over during play.

Making assumptions about the cat’s behavior.

People often make assumptions about the cat’s behavior based on their own expectations and experiences. The shelter is not a perfect predictor of how the cat will behave in your home; while they can give you an idea, it’s up to you to decide whether or not the cat is right for your lifestyle. Don’t assume that a cat doesn’t like you if they don’t immediately run up to greet you; a more aloof personality could mean that he/she needs time to adjust before becoming friendly, or even that he/she prefers some alone time. Don’t assume that a cat who seems shy at first will remain shy forever; he/she could simply be hiding from all of the activity going on around him/her and may become more outgoing once out of the shelter. Don’t assume that a very friendly, affectionate cat will remain friendly and affectionate towards children if there aren’t any in your house, as this could have been due to spending time with children who visited him/her at the shelter regularly. Don’t assume anything about any aspect of the cat’s behavior—the only way to really know how they’ll behave is by adopting them and spending enough time with them to form an opinion (which is why many shelters allow foster care).

Being in a hurry to adopt a cat and not researching or asking questions.

Do your research!

You’re doing this already by reading this blog post. Good for you, and thank you for that.

Some other things you should do: Look at the cat’s behavior (if possible) before adopting them. If not, ask about their temperament and history. Are they friendly? Shy? How old are they? What is their background story? Have they been abused in the past?

Check out its health! Does it need a special diet or have other medical needs that you may be expected to take care of as an owner? Is it okay as a kitty around dogs or young kids?

Ask questions if there’s anything else on your mind. Who could possibly know more about a specific shelter cat than a shelter employee who has been taking care of them every day for weeks?

Not understanding the cat’s schedule and needs when you first bring them home.

Once you bring your new cat home, it’s important to understand that they may be scared and shy at first. Even if they seem friendly at the shelter, it’s likely because they are familiar with their surroundings. If you want to earn their trust right away, the best thing you can do is leave them alone and let them adjust to their new environment at their own pace. It’s a good idea to have an area where the cat can hide for a few days if necessary, like behind a couch or under a bed. Cats like these spaces because they are dark and enclosed. It also provides them with a sense of security until they become more comfortable in their new home.

You should also consider giving your cat treats during these first few days as a way to get them used to you early on. Don’t force your new cat into an interaction with you if he or she does not seem comfortable with it—you don’t want your cat feeling like he must trust you when he actually doesn’t feel safe yet! Just let him know that treats are available when he is ready for them, which will provide him with much-needed comfort while he adjusts without making him feel trapped or cornered.

Just because a cat is at a shelter doesn’t mean that they have done anything wrong – it may just be that their owner was unable to care for them anymore, or they were born there. Shelter cats make wonderful companions!

I find it can be a misconception among people who are adopting for the first time that cats at shelters have done something wrong and that’s why they ended up there. While this may be true sometimes, most of the time cats end up in shelters due to no fault of their own. They may have been abandoned by their owners, or they were born there. Just because a cat is in a shelter does not mean that he is bad – I would argue that many shelter cats make wonderful companions as they are likely seeking attention more than others!

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