The Truth Behind Bird Flu

The H5N1 virus cannot be transmitted between humans.

The H5N1 virus, more commonly known as Avian Influenza A (AI), is a type of bird flu that can affect both birds and humans. In fact, the name AI is derived from its origin in birds! Currently, there is no evidence that the H5N1 virus can be transmitted between humans. Even though this strain of avian influenza cannot spread between people, it still poses a serious threat to public health because of its ability to mutate into a pathogen that can spread easily between humans.

Bird flu does not affect reptiles, amphibians and other animals.

Bird flu is not a disease that affects all animals, even those that are closely related to birds. Reptiles and amphibians are not affected by bird flu. Humans are also not at risk unless they come into contact with infected birds or poultry products. The symptoms in humans include fever, coughing, sore throat and muscle aches. In more severe cases, pneumonia can develop and lead to breathing difficulties, severe respiratory illness and possible death. This is why it’s important to wash your hands thoroughly after handling raw poultry or eggs from infected birds.

It should be noted that the bird flu virus does not stay active for very long outside of a host body.

There is no evidence that the H5N1 virus can spread from birds to humans through contact with cooked chicken.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) , there is no evidence that the H5N1 virus can spread from birds to humans through contact with cooked chicken. Chicken can become infected with this virus, but it cannot be transmitted to people through their consumption of food. Many experts have taken a similar stance, citing research by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and by scientists at WHO indicating that raw poultry poses little risk of spreading H5N1.

Humans are less likely to become infected by the H5N1 virus if they avoid contact with dead or living birds.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, most humans are exposed to bird flu by contact with infected live or dead poultry. People who travel abroad may also become infected if they are exposed to a sick bird while overseas. Less commonly, people can contract the H5N1 virus by touching contaminated surfaces, which can then be transferred to their mouth, nose or eyes.

No matter how careful you are, it’s not always possible to avoid birds in the wild. They can be found everywhere from your backyard to deep in a forest. In cities like New York and London, pigeons often come into close contact with humans; this is particularly true of urban areas where flocks are fed by people on a regular basis.

Because of this, it is important that travelers take extra caution when venturing into rural areas known for high levels of avian flu activity. Those who visit places like China and Bangladesh should take care and speak with local health officials about visiting at-risk areas before traveling.

Follow these steps to protect yourself and your family from bird flu:

So just how can you protect yourself and your family from avian flu? Here are a few simple steps to take, especially if you live in or near an area where infected birds have been found.

  • First, avoid contact with dead or live birds. If you see one of those bright orange stickers on the door of a house, make sure that you steer clear of it because the bird inside may be sick.
  • If a bird does die in your yard or on your property, dispose of it immediately and carefully. And stay at least two feet away from the animal while wearing proper protective gear including long sleeves, rubber gloves and eye protection.
  • Avoid contact with bird droppings (feces). Bird poop contains viruses that can easily spread to humans through inhalation and direct skin contact. So remember to wash your hands with soap and water regularly when dealing with birds—especially when handling their poop and nests.
  • Cook poultry and eggs thoroughly before eating them, as this will kill any bacteria that might be present in these food products before they reach our mouths! This is especially important for those who like their chicken underdone (or even raw).

Thoroughly cooking poultry and eggs before consumption kills the bird flu virus.

Thoroughly cooking poultry and eggs before consumption kills the bird flu virus. You should always cook poultry until it has an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit, or until it is well done. You should also cook your eggs until the yolk is firm, as this will kill viruses. If you are unsure whether or not your meat is cooked enough, use a thermometer to check its temperature! People with weak immune systems and those who interact with them should avoid eating raw poultry and eggs, they may contain bird droppings that carry harmful bacteria.

Infected people experience a sore throat, cough, headache, fever, muscle aches and pains and difficulty breathing.

Symptoms of bird flu in humans include a sore throat, cough, headache, fever, muscle aches and pains, difficulty breathing and sometimes diarrhea, vomiting or abdominal pain. Some people may also develop eye infections (conjunctivitis), mouth ulcers or skin rashes.

If you experience bird flu symptoms after visiting a poultry market where sick birds have been identified as having bird flu or after handling sick or dead birds, you should see your doctor immediately.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. If you don’t have a tissue use your sleeve. Think “cough into crook of arm”.

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. If you don’t have a tissue use your sleeve. Think “cough into crook of arm”.
  • Dispose of tissues in the trash after you use them.
  • Wash hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hands cleaners are also effective.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Knowing these facts will help make you aware of how the H5N1 affects humans

  • The H5N1 does not affect reptiles, amphibians and other animals. Only mammals can be infected by the H5N1 bird flu.
  • There is no evidence that the H5N1 virus can spread from birds to humans through contact with cooked chicken, poultry or eggs at a temperature of 70 degrees Celsius or above.

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