How to Keep Your Pets Safe This Holiday Season

The most basic thing you can do to keep your pet safe is to make sure they’re up-to-date on their vaccines and that they take heartworm prevention if you live in an area where heartworm is a concern.

The most basic thing you can do to keep your pet safe is make sure they’re up-to-date on their vaccines and that they take heartworm prevention if you live in an area where heartworm is a concern. You might think, “They’re indoors, so I don’t have to worry about heartworm.” But even indoor pets can contract heartworm. While the risk for contracting heartworm decreases in the winter months, it does not completely go away. Heartworm disease can still be transmitted from mosquitoes through a crack in a window pane or door as well as from mice and other wildlife that enter your home during the winter months.

And please don’t forget about your feline friends! Heartworm disease is becoming increasingly more common in cats, especially those living in high-risk areas because of their increased exposure due to hunting and eating infected rodents.”

Most pets will be stressed during the holiday season, and that makes them more prone to getting sick.

You’ll also want to make sure your pets have a quiet, private place to go when they’ve had enough of the chaos. A dog crate or cat carrier covered with a blanket can be an ideal option, as it offers a safe space that’s removed from people and other animals while still being accessible.

It’s also crucial to avoid leaving your pet alone for extended periods during this time. Holidays can be especially stressful for animals, and you wouldn’t want them to get sick because you weren’t around to take care of them. Additionally, don’t force them into situations they aren’t comfortable with—such as making dogs or cats interact with people who aren’t part of their immediate family. It may be cute when your dog faces off against Santa instead of sitting on his lap like everyone else wants him to do, but let it go; the animal is already nervous enough as it is!

The holidays are a great time to enjoy holiday trees, food and decorations; but everyone needs to be aware that there are holiday hazards for pets, too.

It’s the most wonderful time of the year, but for your pets it could be anything but. Here are some things you need to keep in mind if you have pets at home during the holidays.

Firstly, take care with decorations that could be dangerous for your pet: tinsel and ribbon can cause intestinal blockages; fragile decorations such as glass ornaments are easily broken; tree lights and electrical cords can cause shock; and holiday plants can be poisonous.

Secondly, make sure that everyone knows not to give chocolate treats to your pet, because they’re very toxic. Check out this website on other foods that may be harmful to your animals: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/people-foods-avoid-feeding-your-pets

And thirdly, make sure that you have good pet insurance in case of emergencies during this hectic time of year. You’ll want to take care with travel and transportation as well — leaving your animals alone or tied up outside is not safe!

The holidays are a joyful and special time of year, but they can also present hazards for our pets and wildlife.

The holidays are a joyful and special time of year, but they can also present hazards for our pets and wildlife.

The first step in keeping your pet safe this holiday season is making sure he or she is up-to-date on vaccines and any needed heartworm prevention. This will ensure your pet stays healthy and happy, even when faced with unexpected changes to their routine – like spending more time indoors than outside. Ask your veterinarian if there are any other steps you should take.

Additionally, make sure that all family members know not to feed human food (like turkey or chocolate) to your dog or cat. It’s best to keep the garbage safely out of reach as well since it may contain bones or other hazardous objects that could cause harm if eaten by your pet.

If you see an animal in trouble this holiday season, remember: The ASPCA is here for you 24/7 at 877-738-6742 to answer questions about how best to help them. Learn more about handling wildlife emergencies at aspca.org/wildlifeemergency.

If you observe your pet carefully and give them the right care and attention, you’ll be able to enjoy some very happy holidays with them.

After being around the house a lot more than normal, it’s easy to see that your pet could be getting bored, and therefore stressed. You should make sure your pet has plenty of toys and things to do while you’re in the house with them. While they may not need as much exercise as they would normally get outdoors, they will still enjoy any physical stimulation you can give them.

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