Baby Or Fledgling? How To Find The Right Bird For Your Home

Baby birds need you and your help to survive.

What should I do if I find a baby bird?

First, it’s important to realize that the best person who can help a baby bird is its own mother. In nearly all cases, the best thing you can do for a fledgling is to keep people and pets away from it so that its mother can return and care for it. It’s likely going to be fine!

However, if you’re not sure whether or not the bird has been abandoned, follow these steps:

  • Ask yourself these questions: Is it injured? Is it covered with lice or mites? Does it appear weak or emaciated? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then the bird may need your help.

But what if I found an injured baby bird on the ground?

If you’ve found a baby bird that is clearly injured — if its neck is bent at an odd angle or there are visible wounds — bring it indoors and put it in a small box lined with tissues until you’re able to bring it to your local wildlife rehabilitator. You can look for one by checking here: https://www.nwrawildlifehelp.org/referrals/ If no wildlife rehabber is listed in your area, call your state’s fish and game agency for assistance.

Fledgling birds need you to stay out of the way.

Fledglings are awesome. They can fly, and they’re pretty fast at it. They’ve got sharp little beaks that can pick up bits of food from the ground or a piece of paper off of your desk if you toss it out for them. But, like any winged prey, they need to get their strength up before they can really spread their wings and fly away to conquer the world. So while they may look like they’re ready to take flight at any moment, don’t try to move them yourself just yet—they’ll probably freak out!

If you see a fledgling bird on the ground, carefully move your feet (or another surface) away from the bird gently so that it doesn’t feel threatened. Stay still and watch to see if you have a chance to help. If you do notice one flittering around nearby, slowly approach it with the intention that you want to help in some way (maybe by providing food or water). It should come over in short order; don’t be afraid to swoop in and pick it up.

Keep in mind that fledglings are still learning how to fly; respect their space as best as you can until they’re ready for more independence.

A bird at stage one, the egg stage, is not a good pet for anyone except an expert breeder.

If you are a new bird owner, your head is probably swimming with questions. How do I feed my bird? How do I handle him? Should he sleep in a cage or what if he wants to change his gender?

In this blog series, we’re going to walk you through the important questions you need to ask yourself before bringing your first bird into the family.

A bird at stage two, the nestling stage, needs a lot of attention.

If you choose to purchase a bird that is at the nestling stage, you will essentially be taking on the role of a parent by feeding your new feathered friend every 15-20 minutes.

This means that you must commit to being available around the clock in order to ensure your bird’s survival and healthy growth.

A bird at stage three, the fledgling stage, is essentially ready to fly away and no longer needs you.

At this stage, the bird is essentially ready to fly away and no longer needs you. Depending on the species, a fledgling can be at this stage for a couple of weeks or a couple of months. During this time, the bird is still learning to fly and needs to spend time on the ground as it learns how to get around in its environment. Fledgling birds are still dependent upon their parents for food, shelter and protection.

If you aren’t sure what to do when you find a baby bird, call a local wildlife rehabilitator or call your local animal control. Do not try to feed a baby bird yourself unless you have experience and proper equipment with which to do so. Always follow local ordinances regarding the keeping of wild animals. Never intentionally try to raise a baby bird unless you are an experienced breeder and are licensed to do so.

If you find a baby bird, or a nest with baby birds in it:

  • Do not try to feed the bird yourself unless you have experience and proper equipment to do so.
  • Call your local wildlife rehabilitator or call animal control, who will know what is best for the little one.
  • Learn about your local ordinances regarding the keeping of wild animals. Never intentionally try to raise a baby bird unless you are an experienced breeder and are licensed to do so.

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