A guide for relocating with a Dog

1. Talk to your dog before your move and explain what’s going to happen.

Talk to your dog before you move and explain what’s going to happen

This may seem silly, but dogs are intelligent creatures. They can understand more than we realize. Start talking to your dog about the move a few weeks in advance. Explain that you’ll be moving and take him on visits to the new house, apartment or condo so he can become familiar with it. Keep telling him how much fun the new place will be and let him know that you’re going to be there for him every step of the way.

2. If you’re moving far away, take your dog to the vet beforehand.

If you and your dog are making a big move, it’s important to plan ahead. First and foremost, take your pup to the vet before any plane, train, or automobile trip. They’ll be able to give you a list of vaccinations and other health requirements that differ from country to country. For example, if you’re traveling outside the U.S., your dog will need a certificate of rabies vaccination, along with other certificates for additional vaccinations depending on where you’re going.

You’ll also need to make sure your pet is microchipped or tattooed so they can get their pet passport—this is required for dogs entering the EU or UK from countries outside the EU (such as the U.S.). If you don’t have this in place beforehand, you may not be able to enter certain countries with your dog!

It’s also important to consider any health-related issues your dog might have that would require special accomodations during travel: do they have trouble walking? Are they claustrophobic? Do they experience car sickness? These things can certainly complicate matters when travelling long distances with an animal.

3. Play soothing music during the car ride or plane trip.

Play soothing music during the car ride or plane trip. As mentioned above, music does wonders for calming and soothing a dog’s nerves. Your pooch will likely enjoy the sounds of anything classical, soft rock, spa or chill-out music. For example, something I like to put on repeat is Norwegian Guitar Paradise by Espen Gronmo. Playing some tunes can also be a good distraction from any loud noises outside while you’re in transit. Music can even help with anxiety on your part as well!

4. When you arrive at your new home, let your dog explore all the different rooms in the house – with supervision, of course! – so he’ll feel comfortable and safe there.

When you arrive at your new home, let your dog explore all the different rooms in the house – with supervision, of course! – so he’ll feel comfortable and safe there. Let him go out into the yard if you have one. Take a walk with him around the neighborhood if possible. He’ll be more comfortable having spent time in each room before you leave him alone.

After moving to your new home, your dog will probably feel lonely for a few days until he gets used to his surroundings and builds up his social life again. It’s going to take some time for both of you to adjust; everyone responds differently but change is always scary, so find ways to make it easier on yourself and your pet.

5. Make sure you have everything you need for your dog before you move into your new home, including food and medicine, etc.

It is easy to get caught up in your own moving needs but do not forget about your dog! To make sure that you are prepared, creates a list of things you will need for your dog so once you get to your new home, all you have to worry about is unpacking. Some things that might be on the list include:

  • Dog food
  • Medicine
  • Dog bed
  • A leash
  • Toys
  • Water bowl
  • Dog treats
  • Collar/harness (if you don’t already have one) with ID tags listing your contact information and rabies vaccination tag. If you’re planning on relocating near a military base, ask if they require a pet microchip since some do and this could save time during the final check-in process at the front gate. If our dog does not already have one, consider getting him microchipped before moving day so he can use it as another form of identification during emergencies or other times when getting lost might happen!

6. If you’re moving far away, find a trustworthy boarding facility where your dog can rest comfortably while you settle in to your new home and schedule that time into your moving timeline.

Another option for when you need to move far away is finding a trustworthy boarding facility where your dog can rest comfortably while you settle in to your new home. The only issue with this is that if you are planning on taking some time to look for apartments or places to live, or if you are going to be busy getting settled into the new place, then it’s best to figure out what dates and times you will need your dog boarded and schedule that time into your moving timeline.

In my experience, I ended up having a friend take care of my dog until I was able to get the “all clear” from the vet and we could go back home. My boyfriend helped me out by paying attention to when my dog would need food/water/walks while I was at work during the day!

7. Introduce your dog to his new environment by walking him around his new neighborhood and taking him to the local park so he can meet some new friends!

After your dog has relaxed in his new home, it’s a good idea to get him out and about to explore his new environment. Take him on walks around the neighborhood, so he can become familiar with the people and places near you.

If there’s a dog park or other off-leash area nearby, take him there to meet some new friends! Introducing your dog to new dogs is an important part of helping him feel comfortable in his new surroundings.

Some dogs are frightened by traffic noises or grocery carts clanging around, so take note of what kinds of things your dog notices as you go for walks in the beginning.

8. Keep things as routine as possible for your dog; feed him at the same times, let him out periodically throughout each day so he doesn’t get too restless or lonely, etcetera.

When you’re moving, it can be easy to forget that your dog is going through a lot of changes too. Keeping the transitions smooth for your pup will help him feel comfortable at home—especially if he’s staying with someone new while you move.

  • Feed your dog at his usual times each day and let him out periodically so he doesn’t get too restless or lonely.

If there is any way to arrange for a familiar face to take care of him in your absence, it may help alleviate some anxiety as well.

Moving is stressful enough without worrying about how it will affect a beloved family member like our pets!

Moving home is a stressful time for pets too, and it’s important to know how to keep your dog safe and comfortable during the move. Remember that even the most well behaved dogs can be nervous around strangers or in new environments. You should plan ahead for your move, so you have everything you need ready for when you get to your new home.

Before you leave for your new home, make sure that your dog has been fed and watered so he’s full and relaxed in the car. During the journey, it’s also a good idea to take plenty of breaks from driving – no more than 2 hours at a time – so they can stretch their legs and relieve themselves if they need to. On hot days, make sure that any dogs are not left in parked vehicles unattended as this could prove fatal in minutes!

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